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Posts from the ‘Social Justice’ Category

Reserve Judgements

This story first appeared in The Coast on Jan 20, 2011:

Two landmark environmental racism cases are coming to a head; one could change how polluting companies do business in Canada
By Chris Benjamin

In mid-September, the Pictou Landing First Nation band council filed a lawsuit Read more

Rebuilding Halifax’s most feared neighbourhood

This story first appeared in the Globe and Mail on Sept 24, 2010:

Gottingen Street, Halifax’s premier retail strip in the 1960s, has an unenviable reputation these days. Read more

Midwifery is ready for delivery, but mainstream public health lags

This story first appeared in This Magazine on Feb 16, 2010:

In March 2009, Nova Scotia became the seventh province to incorporate midwifery into the public health care system. Instead of paying and arranging for the service privately, residents now have it covered and regulated by the provincial government.

Midwifery should be seen as the progressive (yet traditional) and cost-effective method of childbirth in Canada. But the upfront cost of creating a regulatory body for midwives, Read more

The Myth of the Wealthy Environmentalist

This story first appeared in Briarpatch Magazine on July 1, 2009:

The mercury hit 99 degrees celcius. The steam hit my eyes and Uncle Reijo started talking about snow. Read more

March protests criminalization of black youth

This story first appeared in The Coast on June 25, 2009:

In the wake of police action at the Auburn Drive high School, Black Independence Network Nova Scotia and other groups stage a march through Halifax. Read more

Mi’kmaw Adaptation

This story first appeared in The Coast on June 25, 2009:

Psst, hey, climate change deniers: Halifax Harbour is rising, and you don’t need a PhD in carbon core analytics to prove it. A simple observatory pillar in the harbour does the trick—and that’s how city staff measures water levels. And if you don’t trust a low-tech solution, 90 years of tidal records agree with the pillar. These show that not only is our harbour rising, it’s rising faster than the most dire predictions of modern climate science. Read more

The detestable solution: Prison reform in Ghana

This story first appeared in Briarpatch Magazine on May 1, 2009:

Under colonial rule, Ghana’s multiple traditional systems of justice were replaced by a single, expensive, incarceration-based penal system. Now, 52 years independent and among the poorest 15 per cent of nations, Ghana is at the mercy of foreign countries for financial support in maintaining its overcrowded prisons, retraining prison staff and educating prisoners in an effort to upgrade a system of punishment that is falling into disfavour in the wealthier nations from which it originates. Read more

Naomi Klein’s Shock Doctrine

This story first appeared in The Coast on Sept 24, 2008:

Naomi Klein argues that right-wing ideologues create and use moments of crisis to advance a regressive agenda.
By Chris Benjamin

It starts with a violent coup by dictatorAugusto Pinochet September 11, 1973. The Chicago Boys, a gang of Chilean economists trained by free market guru Milton Friedman, are uncannily prepared with a manifesto of economic policy, “The Brick.” It lands heavy on the left-leaning populace, inducing a state of shock. Read more

Africville art marks the spot

This story first appeared in The Coast on Sept 4, 2008:

Dal students and community leaders mark the doomed African Canadian community with signposts and structures. Read more

Lincolnville dumped on again

This story first appeared in The Coast on Aug 7, 2008:

As residents next to provincial dump can’t seem to air concerns to any level of government, the stink of environmental racism grows stronger. Read more